A Dozen Ways To Die (In The Backcountry)

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Tree Top Flyer
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Post by Tree Top Flyer » Sun May 13, 2007 7:34 pm

Let's say, you have a curious nature about yourself that leads you to go places you probably shouldn't be going walking. Say, an alligator and poisonous snake infested swamp. Let's call said swamp, the Great Okeefenokee Swamp on southern Ga.

As if the gators and snakes aren't challenging enough, decide to go when the place is experiencing a major drought and happens to be on fire. And if that's not enough, how about you go when there's a lot of lighning predicted for that day which most likely will start more fires.

Lastly, don't tell anyone you're going and wear flip flops on your happy little jaunt through this den of death.

No, I'm dumb, but not that dumb. But a buddy of mine sure is and only suffered some slighly toasted eyebrows and a really bad case of poison ivy. He still insists that it was a good idea and has plans to return to the swamp, very soon. I say, probably permanantely.
Tree Top Flyer
KSVN, Ga

Tree Top Flyer
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Post by Tree Top Flyer » Sun May 13, 2007 7:40 pm

I just realized that knuckleheads trip to the swamp consisted of 7 items on your list:

1. Lightning
2. Insects
3. Predators
4. Drowning
5. Snakes and Spiders
6. Heat Stress (since he took along one small bottle of water and nothing else).
7. Falling into mouth of alligator since you're wearing flip flops in a swamp.
ah, why not and....

8. Suicide, c'mon if you do all this wrong, you're trying to off yourself.
Tree Top Flyer
KSVN, Ga

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Guests
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Post by Guests » Tue Sep 04, 2007 1:43 pm

I'm surprised lightening doesn't top the list. I've had some close calls with it over the years, especially while hiking in the Wind River Range in Wyoming. Afternoon thunderstorms seem to come out of no where out there and you really have to be careful - ie. get up early and avoid hiking in mid-afternoon.

Stagefright
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Post by Stagefright » Thu Oct 04, 2007 5:40 am

With all the buzz on here re: Into The Wild, better add starvation.

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Guests
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Post by Guests » Tue Jun 10, 2008 2:38 pm

I tried to cross a flooded stream once in Maine. It was only about eight feet across, but the water was moving so fast that I got swept off my feet and nearly drowned. Can't say I'm suprised to see that one on here.

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Guests
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Post by Guests » Wed Sep 10, 2008 6:23 am

To your point ... I just saw this on the NPS Morning Report:

Grand Canyon National Park (AZ)
Visitor Dies In Seventy Foot Fall

Shortly before sunset on August 28th, park dispatch received a satellite phone call from a commercial river trip reporting that a 62-year-old man who was part of the group had taken a 70-foot fall while hiking in Stone Creek Canyon, a side canyon of the Colorado River that is a popular day hiking destination for river travelers. He was reported to have sustained skull and leg fractures. ICS was put into effect and a rescue operation begun. The park’s helicopter was in the area, returning from an interagency search mission in Havasu Creek, and was diverted to the scene. Due to limited daylight, the helicopter crew was only able to insert a Coconino County Search and Rescue team member who also works as a flight medic for a local air ambulance. Meanwhile, Arizona Department of Public Safety's Air Rescue helicopter from Kingman was launched to make a night landing to provide additional medical and evacuation personnel. The DPS crew, which flies with night vision goggles, landed at Stone Creek but was unable to reach the victim due to darkness and hazardous terrain. They were notified that the flight medic on scene had reached the man and determined that the fall had been fatal. On the morning of August 29th, recovery operations were begun. A human radio relay was positioned on a canyon rim near the incident location and park staff were inserted by helicopter for recovery, investigation, and helicopter operations. A critical incident stress counselor from the Whale Foundation, which provides access to mental and physical healthcare and support services to the professional river guide community, was also inserted to remain with the river trip. The victim was extracted from the canyon in a helicopter long line operation and flown to the South Rim helibase for transfer to the Coconino County Medical Examiner's Office. [Submitted by Pete Fonken, Park Ranger]

The Camel
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Post by The Camel » Fri Sep 11, 2009 6:33 am

#13: Camp on Rabun Bald during a thunderstorm.

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BirdShooter
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Post by BirdShooter » Tue Jun 22, 2010 2:23 pm

I almost fell on this hike near Vegas. Here's a trip report with the details. I'm not suprised that "Falling" is #1:

https://yourhikes.com/TripPages/ViewTri ... TripID=232

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Guests
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Post by Guests » Tue Oct 19, 2010 4:23 pm

People rely on technology too much to save them - GPS, cell phone, etc. If you are going in to the backcountry you need to take a map and compass and learn how to use them. A GPS or cell phone will not do you much good once the battery is dead.

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Guests
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Post by Guests » Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:41 pm

When in doubt - take a friend. That would save many a life in the backcountry.

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