GPS Help Pleazzz!

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Guests
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Post by Guests » Fri Sep 29, 2006 2:24 pm

I'm in the market for a GPS and could use some guideance. Should I get a GPS that kicks out coordinates and save some money, get the type with the topographical maps on them, or get the walkie-talkie/GPS model. If anyone has any experience, please let me know. I'm going on a week-long trip in Maine in two weeks and want to work with it before I hit the trail. How is the learning curve on those things??? Thanks Ken Reading Billings, MT

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Guests
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Post by Guests » Tue Oct 31, 2006 5:29 am

To me the GPS is just another gadet to deal with that I don't really need. You need a map and compass anyway, and if you know how to use them they seem more reliable - no batteries to deal with, no LCD to crack/go bad, etc. Call me old school, but they don't seem worth the effort.

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Post by Guests » Tue Nov 14, 2006 2:52 pm

Took one on a AT overnight trip from Woody Gap to Tesnatee. Couldn't get a satellite fix beneath the trees, consumed two sets of batteries, and provided little useful information. It did provide elevation - sometimes - that could perhaps help you locate yourself on the topo. I've just been using the map and compass so long that I see no extra benefits from the GPS. Maybe to anchor your beer in the creek ...

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Post by Tree Top Flyer » Mon Jan 01, 2007 6:56 am

I've been hiking and flying with GPS for almost 8 years and although my aircraft has two built in, I won't go flying or hiking without my own personal GPS (Magellan Sport Trac). It's like insurance, if you don't have it, you're gonna need it.
I'm still very old school in my navigating though. I prefer using a map and compass on hikes with the GPS as a great way to leave "breadcrumbs" or just to find where in the world I parked my truck.

I'd also suggest the Explorists series, not too bad on the wallet and comes with topos and mapsend at some retailers.

Wayne
Savannah, GA
Tree Top Flyer
KSVN, Ga

Stagefright
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Post by Stagefright » Wed Jan 24, 2007 6:52 am

I have owned a Garmin Legend and now have a Garmin Rino. Frankly, I found the Legend much easier to use - particularly when it comes to uploading maps. I went with the Rino this time since it is a combo GPS/walkie-talkie unit and the Legend that I bought in 2001 now has a glitch with the screen where it flickers on/off. Garmin only warranties the GPS's for a year - so keep that in mind when you buy one. They aren't cheap.

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Post by FreakShow » Wed May 09, 2007 12:57 am

I too have found the GPS somewhat useless especially in the summer where I live - too many leaves = no reception. Although I do see the benefits under the right circumstances.

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Post by Guests » Fri Jun 29, 2007 5:37 am

I've been carrying my Magellan 315 for years. It has its limits in deep canyons or under heavy trees, but when it locks in there is no debate about whether this nose or that one over there is the one on the map. You can also use it to mark handy things for future reference, like shelter, caves, water, etc. In my part fo the US, topo maps are apparently made by the lowest bidder in a foreign country, because they are more of a reference tool than something you want to bet your life on.

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Post by TreeFrog » Fri Jul 06, 2007 12:07 am

I have a Garmin and have pretty happy with it. My only beef is that it drains the batteries way too fast. I can't run it for more than a few hours at a time. But it's nice to take the guess work out of the backcountry experience.

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Post by WolfemanNC » Tue Sep 11, 2007 6:34 am

I got the Magellan SportTrak a couple of years ago and love it. I typically don't leave home without it, though I do carry a map and compass as well (extra batteries add weight). I would look at the smaller versions out now (Garmin, etc.) and wouldn't bother with the walkie-talkie version. As I understand, you can only transmit your posit. to someone else w/ the same system and, with thick forest, you won't even get a 2-mile distance on the signal.

my 2 cents...

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Post by BirdShooter » Wed Sep 26, 2007 12:49 am

I have a Garmin Rino as well. The GPS works well, but the walkie-talkie function seems below average given the price. It's still nice to carry one device over two, but it's not particularly lightweight.

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